Tag Archives: rewards

10 weeks in

So we’re now… 10 weeks1(?) since I started at Rainbird which, in theory, has given time for the shine to wear off and the mundane to kick off – except it hasn’t. There are a few very good reasons for this.

Almost every day is exciting

A bad day for me these days is orders of magnitude better than a good day in some of my previous roles. “Bad” days generally happen because I’ve not completed something I wanted to complete, or I’ve made a mistake; they’re going to happen, no matter how good the job is. I hold myself to incredibly high standards and not having a bad day now and then would mean I’m not pushing myself hard enough.

It’s not a job…

I’m not there for the pay. I’m there for the challenge and the chance to create something seriously cool. I do the hours I do (including weekends and evenings) not because I have to, but because I want to.

…for anyone

We’re not carrying anyone. Everyone is there because they want to be there. It’s not just a job for them either. If something needs doing, it gets done by the first person who is able to do it.

It’s open

There are no political games, no power plays or empire building. Everyone knows what’s going on, warts and all, and everyone gets their say. It’s not a democracy (and nor would I want it to be, I haven’t got the first clue about some aspects of running a startup), but it is a benevolent dictatorship2 and that works really well.

It benefits me

My hard work has a direct effect on my rewards. I’m not working hard to allow someone else to benefit, I’m working hard for our benefit which is a huge incentive. Every day I can see progress towards our common goal and, while there are setbacks, there is an overarching feeling of moving forward.

Work, for me, is still something I am finding hugely fun, and massively rewarding.


1 I think that’s right, but it seems an awfully long time. That said, time does bizarre things at Rainbird and the days do seem to be flying by. Time flies when you’re having fun 🙂

2 Someone has to call the shots, and doing that by majority rule isn’t always the best way, especially when you’re dealing with areas of specialist knowledge where only one person may have the necessary experience