Tumbler and low level stories

I’ve run into a bit of a brick wall with Tumbler in so far as I think I’m using it at far too low a level. I’ve got a fairly simple object at the moment, little more than a bean, which I’m using as a working example to try these new techniques out. While my first story and group of scenarios were easy to write I started running into issues with the second group. The issues are twofold. Firstly I’m having to learn to rethink how I group my tests to fit into stories and scenarios. While working this through I started butting into problems with long class and method names which I can’t really shorten as there will, eventually, be literally hundreds of tests and I need to be able to distinguish between them.

After fiddling about with different ways of framing the stories and scenarios I discovered that its annotations aren’t picked up by the JUnit plugin for Eclipse so I can’t rely on them to make readable tests, I have to use readable class and method names.

Then, I discovered that Tumbler isn’t hierarchical. Stories are listed on the index page, then you can drill down into a story and see it’s scenarios. That’s it. If I had 100 stories I’d have to wade through all of them on the front page. What I need is epics.

This all rather makes sense for a tool that’s going to be used at a higher level, detailing 20 or 30 user stories that constitute an application, but I want the ability to test at different levels. After all, as I understand it, BDD can be considered fractal in its nature and is as easily applied to a users interaction with a save dialog box as it is to the save method call on some object somewhere. Yes, the players change, and yes the granularity and precision of the inputs and outputs change, but it’s the same fundamental thought process when developing the tests.

In order to shed some light on the issue I tool a look at the Tumbler source, specifically the test cases, but they were all at the user level. Tumbler itself isn’t that complicated a program so it may be that these user stories suffice for testing the majority of the code, but I want to know at an object level that they do what they say on the tin.

Sadly, the majority of this discovery has been performed on the train with its connectivity issues so performing research into alternative tools is proving hard. That said, given Tumbler isn’t massively complex I may just put my current project to one side, fork that and get it to work at both the low and high levels. In the mean time it seems like I need to do more research.